Tag Archives: Composite Materials

Graphene-based composite nanomaterial can prevent the overheating of lithium-ion batteries

Although the performance of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) have been remarkably improved in the past decades, there is a big risk in the use of this type of battery: they can catch fire when they are subjected to abuse. Researchers from Stanford University have developed a nanocomposite material which can be included into the electrodes in order to prevent the explosion of the battery.


To perform in an efficient way, LIBs require operation conditions which are within a specific range of current density, voltage and temperature. Nevertheless, when they are subjected to abuse conditions, exothermic reactions can take place, leading to a fast increase in internal temperature and pressure. What does it mean? Well, our battery is likely to explode!

Current LIBs include external sensors to prevent overheating and overpressure but, unfortunately, temperature and pressure inside the cells can actually increase much faster than they can be detected by those external sensors. Because of that, several alternatives have been developed in order to include internal components to solve the problem. For example, ceramic coating has been proven to be an effective way to shut down the battery and improving the thermal tolerance. However, after the battery is shut down, it cannot be used again. Using solid-state electrolytes can be another option, but the overall performance of the battery is decreased due to their low ionic conductivity. Read more

Mechanics of composites

A while ago, I wrote a simple document for undergraduates in order to explain that composite materials can fail in different ways. This was created as a high level document which could be used to find useful references with regards to failure modes, basic failure criteria and damage propagation models. I wanted to share this with you in case you are new in this field or just if you simply want to learn some basics of composites!


A composite can be defined as a material which is composed of two or more constituents of different chemical properties, with resultant properties different to those of the individual components. They usually consist of a continuous phase (matrix) and a distributed phase (reinforcement). These reinforcements can be fibrous, particulate or lamellar and they are usually stiff and strong, so that they are responsible for providing the stiffness and the strength of the composite. On the other hand, the matrix provides shear strength, toughness and resistance to the environment.

Fibre reinforced composites are considered as the strongest and sometimes also the stiffest, due to:

  • Alignment of molecules or structural elements.
  • Very fine structures.
  • Elimination of defects.
  • Unique structures.
  • Statistical factors.

With regards to fibre reinforced composite materials, their main failure modes are:

  • Fibre failure induced by tension in fibre direction.
  • Fibre failure induced by compression in fibre direction.
  • Matrix fracture induced by tension.
  • Matrix fracture induced by compression.
  • Delamination

It is remarkable that fibre failure typically caused composite failure, whereas matrix failure may not cause the same drastic effect. Read more

Carbures is back on track

After a relatively long period of instabilities, the Spanish composite manufacturer Carbures is raising again. This is really good news for the Spanish industry and for all those engineers who are interested in this kind of advanced material.


It’s just been made public that in 2016 Carbures reached their historic record in terms of the production of aircraft components made of composite materials. As a matter of fact, their production has increased 16.2% with respect to 2015, manufacturing a total of 45,695 aircraft parts. Therefore, we can say that Carbures have returned to the place where they belong: being one of the top composite manufacturers for the European aerospace and defence sectors.

For those who don’t know the company, they produce structures for quite a few members of the Airbus fleet. For instance, some of the civil airplanes which use their components are: A320, A320NEO, A330, A340, A350 or even the impressive A380. In addition, they also contribute to the military sector (e.g. A400M). The parts which are manufactured by Carbures include from lids of the oil tanks of the engine to parts of the fuselage. Read more